Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives et Intégratives d'Aquitaine (UMR5287)

Aquitaine Institute for Cognitive and Integrative Neuroscience



INCIA - UMR 5287- CNRS
Université de Bordeaux

Zone nord Bat 2 2ème étage
146, rue Léo Saignat
33076 Bordeaux cedex
France

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CNRS Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes Université de Bordeaux

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Home > Latest publications

The role of the endocannabinoid system as a therapeutic target for autism spectrum disorder: Lessons from behavioral studies on mouse models

by Loïc Grattier - published on

Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Susanna Pietropaolo a,*, Giovanni Marsicano b
a Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, EPHE, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33000, Bordeaux, France
b INSERM, U1215 NeuroCentre Magendie, 146 rue L ́eo Saignat, 33077, Bordeaux Cedex, France
article in press


A B S T R A C T

Recent years have seen an impressive amount of research devoted to understanding the etiopathology of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and developing therapies for this syndrome. Because of the lack of biomarkers of ASD, this work has been largely based on the behavioral characterization of rodent models, based on a multitude of
genetic and environmental manipulations. Here we highlight how the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has recently emerged within this context of mouse behavioral studies as an etiopathological factor in ASD and a valid potential therapeutic target. We summarize the most recent results showing alterations of the ECS in rodent models of ASD, and demonstrating ASD-like behaviors in mice with altered ECS, induced either by genetic or pharmacological manipulations. We also give a critical overview of the most relevant advances in designing treatments and novel mouse models for ASD targeting the ECS, highlighting the relevance of thorough and innovative behavioral approaches to investigate the mechanisms acting underneath the complex features of ASD.